Back to Top

Nils Karsten

(PDF)

Nils Karsten lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

EDUCATION

2003 Master of Fine Arts, Painting, Vermont College of the Union Institute, Montpelier, Vermont
2002 The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Skowhegan, Maine
1999 Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honors, Painting, School of Visual Arts, New York

 

SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2012 Suburbia Hamburg 1983, Churner and Churner, New Yor
2011 1969, 1970, 1971, The Bogart Salon, Brooklyn
Nils Karsten, Ubu Gallery, New York
Can’t Find My Way Home, Illuminated Metropolis, New York
2010 Collagen & Zeichnungen, Anke Richter Galerie, Friedrichstadt, Germany
2007 dunkel, dunkel, hell, hell, Marvelli Gallery, New York   
2006 Heaven Has No Happy Ending, Marvelli Gallery, New York
2005 60 Seconds in Heaven, Marvelli Gallery, New York

 

GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2013 The Beauty of Friends Coming Together, I & II, curated by Phong Bui, The Dedalus  Foundation, New York
2012 Utopia/Dystopia, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Houston, Texas
2011 Jam Session, Islip Art Museum, Islip, New York
Till All Is Green, Miyako Yoshinaga art prospects, New York
85th Annual International Competition, The Print Center, Philadelphia
  Prints, Long Beach Island Foundation of the Arts and Sciences, Loveladies, New Jersey
2010 Tenth Anniversary Event, IPCNY, New York
Untitled (plate tectonics), LMAKprojects, New York
Momenta Benefit 2010, Momenta Art Gallery, Brooklyn
New Prints 2010/Winter, IPCNY, New York
2009 Octet: Codes and Contexts in Recent Art, SVA Gallery, New York 
Octet, Pera Museum, Istanbul, Turkey
2007 Pricked: Extreme Embroidery, Museum of Arts and Design, New York 
2006 Crossovers, Contrasts Gallery, Shanghai, China
Nightmares of Summer, Marvelli Gallery, New York
2005 Paradise Lost, Marvelli Gallery, New York
Benaddiction, Goliath Visual Space, Brooklyn
2004 Beginning Here: 101 Ways, Visual Arts Gallery, New York
Pickup Lines, Geoffrey Young Gallery, Great Barrington, Mass.
Figure Out, Gallery Joe, Philadelphia
superSalon, Samson Projects, Boston
Out of Heaven, Vox Populi, Philadelphia
Raising the Brow, Earl McGrath Gallery, Los Angeles
Raising the Brow, Earl McGrath Gallery, New York
2003 Works on Paper, Marvelli Gallery, New York
Star67, Brooklyn
Goethe Institut, New York
Were you alright yesterday?, White Columns, New York
2002 Benaddiction, Goliath Visual Space, Brooklyn
Band of Outsiders, HallSpace, Boston
2001 The worst of Gordon Pym continued…, Printed Matter, New York
Rotunda Gallery, Brooklyn
Flatfiles, Pierogi, Brooklyn
Dirty Drawings, Tobey Fine Arts, New York
 1999 Traveling Goliath, Hamburg, Germany
 1998 Visual Arts GalleryNew York

 

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

2013 Rob Shuster, “Best in Show: Gone Vicious”, The Village Voice (January 9, 2013)
2008 “Interview with Nils Karsten,” Phantasmaphile, February 18, 2008,
http://www.phantasmaphile.com/2008/02/nils-karsten–1.html
2006  David Cohen, “The Dark Side of Summer,” The New York Sun, June 15, 2006
2005  Thomas Micchelli, “Heaven Has no Happy Ending,” The Brooklyn Rail
(December  2005 – January 2006)
2004  Roberta Fallon, “A Pose By Any Other Name,” Philadelphia Weekly, May 19, 2004
2003  Ken Johnson, “Were you alright yesterday?,” New York Times, February

“The woodcut might seem like a rather staid choice for relating memories of punk rock, but in Nils Karsten’s hands, the old-fashioned printing technique—German in origin—neatly evokes the raw energy of the music scene the artist encountered as a teen in Hamburg.”

Rob Shuster, “Best in Show: Gone Vicious”, The Village Voice (January 9, 2013)

“Nils Karsten’s collages display a macabre sense of humor.”

David Cohen, “The Dark Side of Summer,” The New York Sun (June 15, 2006)

“The destruction of innocence may be a common theme in contemporary art, but Karsten goes further than most in portraying children as both victims and perpetrators—the inevitable endgame of unprotected kids seeking their own sources of physical and sexual power.”

Thomas Micchelli, “Heaven Has no Happy Ending,” The Brooklyn Rail (December 2005 – January 2006)

“While reflecting the culture’s obsession with children and sex, Karsten’s also got war and alienation on his mind, as you can see in the symbolic objects that swirl around the figures.”

Roberta Fallon, “A Pose By Any Other Name,” Philadelphia Weekly (May 19, 2004)

Ken Johnson, “Were you alright yesterday?,” New York Times (February, 2003)