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Karen Heagle

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Born 1967, Tomah, Wisconsin. Lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

 

EDUCATION

1997 Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Skowhegan, Maine
1995 MFA, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY
1990 BFA, University of Wisconsin – Stout, Menomonie, Wisconsin

 

SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2013 Battle Armor, Churner and Churner, New York
2011 Let Nature Take Its Course and Hope It Passes, I-20 Gallery, New York
2008 Karen Heagle: She’ll Get Hers, I-20 Gallery, New York
2006 Karen Heagle: Strictly Naturals, I-20 Gallery, New York
2003 Fierce, 31GRAND, Brooklyn
2001 Puritans, Perverts, and Feminists, 31GRAND, Brooklyn

 

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2013
The Power of Paper, (forthcoming) Saatchi Gallery, London
I Killed My Father, I Ate Human Flesh, I Quiver with Joy: a Pasolini Obsession, curated   by Benjamin Tischer, and Risa Needleman, Allegra LaViola Gallery, New York
2012 Art on Paper Biennial, Weatherspoon Museum of Art, Greensboro, North Carolina
Shake Off the Dust, Allegra LaViola Gallery, New York
The Mutable Portrait, Clifford Chance, New York
2011 Vivid, curated by Janet Phelps, Schroeder, Romero and Shredder, New York
2010 Raw State, curated by Marina Ancona, Shelby Street Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico
Next Wave Art, curated by Dan Cameron, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Brooklyn
Lush Life 3: First Birds (A Few Butterflies), curated by Franklin Evans and Omar Lopez-Chahoud, Invisible Exports, New York
Elements of Nature: Selections from the Fredrick R. Weisman Art Foundation, City of   Lancaster Museum, Lancaster, California
2009 Lover, curated by Kate Gilmore and Candice Madey, On Stellar Rays, New York
2008 The Guys We Would Fuck, curated by Nayland Blake, Monya Rowe Gallery, New York
2007 I remember nothing…, SHAG Sehlman Helwaser Art Gallery, New York
No New Tale To Tell, 31GRAND, Brooklyn
2006 Men, organized by Ellen Altfest, I-20 Gallery, New York
Panic Room, Deste Foundation Centre For Contemporary Art, Athens, Greece
You have to be almost gifted to do what I do, curated by Oliver Newton and Steven Stewart, Alexander and Bonin, New York
2005 Culture Vulture, curated by David Gibson, Jack the Pelican Presents, Brooklyn
2004 Rimbaud, curated by Max Henry, I-20 Gallery, New York
2003 Superheroes, Ruby Green Contemporary Art, Nashville, Tennessee
Now Playing, curated by John Connelly, D’amelio Terras, New York
Girls Gone Wild, curated by Katherine Bernhardt, Bronwyn Keenan, New York
2002 Queer Visualities, curated by Carl Pope, Stony Brook University Art Gallery, New York
Enough About Me, curated by Deborah Kass, Momenta Art, Brooklyn
2001 Smirk: Woman, Art, Humor, curated by Debra Wacks, Firehouse Art Gallery, Nassau Community College, Long Island 
Danica Phelps: Trade Two, LFL Gallery, New York

 

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

2013 Holland Carter, “Museum and Gallery Listings for June 14-20″, The New York Times (June 13, 2013).

Liz Insogna, “Fluid Fire”, The Huffington Post (June 12, 2013)

Bradley Rubenstein, “Nights Without Armor”, ArtSlant (June 11, 2013)
Oscar A. Laluyan, “Karen Heagle Is Fully Armed to Battle”, Arte Fuse (May 13, 2013)
Holland Cotter, “I Killed My Father, I Ate Human Flesh, I Quiver with Joy; An obsession with Pier Paolo Pasolini,” The New York Times (March 7, 2013)
2011 Roberta Smith,  “Karen Heagle: Let Nature Take Its Course and Hope It Passes,” The New York Times (October 28, 2011)
Joseph R. Wolin “Review: Karen Heagle, ‘Let Nature Take Its Course and Hope It Passes,’’ Time Out New York (October 19, 2011) p. 33.
Cassandra Neyenesch, “Uncertain Narrative: Q + A with Karen Heagle,”
Art In America.com (October 19, 2011)
Bradley Rubenstein, “Beauty and the Beast,” Culture Catch (October 3, 2011)
Stephanie Buhmann, “Four galleries offer food for thought,” Downtown Express (October 12, 2011)
Roberta Smith,  “VIVID and PAVERS,” The New York Times (January 21, 2011)
2010 Holland Cotter, “Lower East Side Tale, Refracted Nine Times,” The New York Times (July 8, 2010)
2009 Aimee Walleston, “Costume Change/ Jimmy Paul,” The Moment Blog, Nytimes.com.(July, 2009)
Avram Finklestein, “Art, History,” Pride 09 (June 2009)
Rosenberg, Susan. ”Karen Heagle.” Review. Art In America, (April 2009)
2008 “Karen Heagle” The New Yorker (November 25, 2008)
Brittany Salisbury, “Karen Heagle,” Arforum.com
2007 Jerry Saltz, Looking Back…Sometimes in Anger,” Artnet (January 17, 2007)
Jerry Saltz, “Moving Arts,” Village Voice (January 5, 2007)
2006 Roberta Smith, “Chelsea is a Battlefield: Galleries Muster Groups,” New York Times (July 28, 2006)
Carrie Moyer, “Luscious and Eccentric; Karen Heagle’s lesbian camp and also a new departure in poignancy,” Gay City News, Volume 5, Number 9, (March 2 –  8, 2006)
Max Henry, “Karen Heagle, “Strictly Naturals,” Time Out New York, Issue 544, (March 2 – 8, 2006)
James Wagner, “Karen Heagle at I-20,” jameswagner.com, (January 28, 2006, 11:25 pm)
Edward Winkleman, “Artist of the Week, 01/16/06,” edwardwinkleman.blogspot.com, (January 16, 2006.)
2003 Roberta Smith, “Girls Gone Wild,” New York Times, (July 4, 2003) p. 31.
2001 Jerry Saltz, “Something Wild,” Village Voice (Dec. 25, 2001) p. 73.
Susan Hamburger, “Puritans, Perverts, and Feminists @ 31GRAND,” Waterfront Week, vol. 11.24, (Dec. 13, 2001) p. 6.
Debra Wacks, “Smirk: Woman Art Humor,” Catalogue

“Karen Heagle takes emblems of Medievalism and disarms them with color.”

Holland Carter, “Museum and Gallery Listings for June 14-20″, The New York Times (June 13, 2013)

“It’s the armor and the implicit religious undertones that seem to leap out at me when looking at the work. It’s also the way [Heagle has] been able to rework playing around with gender roles in fantasy or in a fantastic way.”

Liz Insogna, “Fluid Fire”, The Huffington Post (June 12, 2013)

“Heagle treats paper as if it were canvas; her figures and objects rendered life-sized and the application of the various leafing sheets give the work an otherworldly light, such that they call to mind Russian icons or the Northern European devotional triptychs of van Eyck.”

Bradley Rubenstein, “Nights Without Armor”, ArtSlant (June 11, 2013)

“There is the lush opulence of using copper and gold leaf symbolizing the luster of metal where the acrylic paint and colored paper become punctuated embellishments to fully realize Heagle’s bold interpretation. The iridescent palette and its swarthy strokes recall a Peter Max color sensibility but Heagle makes it her own by her crisp execution in the composition.”

Oscar A. Laluyan, “Karen Heagle Is Fully Armed to Battle”, Arte Fuse (May 13, 2013)

“Any show with Karen Heagle’s honest, full-hearted painting is interesting, and she has several examples here, including a likeness of Pasolini’s lover Ninetto Davoli.”

Holland Cotter, “I Killed My Father, I Ate Human Flesh, I Quiver with Joy; An obsession with Pier Paolo Pasolini,” The New York Times (March 7, 2013)

“Karen Heagle is taking her time when it comes to artistic development, negotiating her own particular fusion of personal Symbolism…”

Roberta Smith, “Karen Heagle: Let Nature Take Its Course and Hope It Passes,” The New York Times (October 28, 2011)

“In nine mostly large paintings on paper, Karen Heagle endows unlikely subjects with a kind of magic.”

Joseph R. Wolin “Review: Karen Heagle, ‘Let Nature Take Its Course and Hope It Passes,’’ Time Out New York (October 19, 2011) p. 33.

“Karen Heagle skirts sophisticated taste with simple and muscular garage-art renderings that attain moments of rough expressionism.”

Cassandra Neyenesch, “Uncertain Narrative: Q + A with Karen Heagle,” Art In America.com (October 19, 2011)

“This incautious, ecumenical exhibition of paintings by women spans several generations, styles and a range of reputations.”

Roberta Smith, “VIVID and PAVERS,” The New York Times (January 21, 2011)

“And the show at Invisible-Exports expands rather than merely illustrates the novel by pushing the bird imagery hard: in Nicholas di Genova’s ballpoint-pen drawing of freakish winged creatures; in Karen Heagle’s fantastic painting of vultures picking over fruit; and in Dana Levy’s ghostly video of live doves flocking and fluttering in a museum gallery filled with stuffed bird specimens.”

Holland Cotter, “Lower East Side Tale, Refracted Nine Times,” The New York Times (July 8, 2010)